Niels Smits Van Burgst

Paintings by Niels Smits Van Burgst

Born in Maassluis, The Netherlands in 1970, Niels Smits Van Burgst is a figurative painter whose work reveals moments of his personal life experiences and those shared with close friends and acquaintances. He currently lives in Rotterdam where he works in a large studio near the Sparta Stadium.

Niels Smits Van Burgst attended the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hage where he earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1993 and his Masters Degree in 1994. He committed himself in 1994 to depicting the experience of life awareness in his paintings. Initially he concentrated on painting private and personal experiences; over time, he gradually extended his work to include friends and people casually met through the course of life. 

The main emphasis of Van Burgst’s work is to show an identity, an understanding of what it means to be alive in Western society. His paintings, with their broad brushstrokes and cool palettes, provide the memories for their subjects’ life experiences. In many of Van Brugst’s works, he presents images of men existing in a civilized world where their excesses, such as lust, aggression and euphoria, are personally suppressed. In society, however, excesses are still experienced by individuals through sylized media channels such as television, the internet, and film.

Niels Smits Van Burgst’s  paintings have been exhibited in New York, Berlin, Amterdam, Brussels, and many more cities across Europe. A retrospective of his work was held in 2013 at the Museum ‘de Buitenplaats in Eelde, Netherlands. Van Burgst won the Van Ommeren de Voogd Foundation Prize for Fine Art in 2007 and the Aku in 2011. His paintings are in collections both private and public.

Niels Smits Van Burgst is represented by “De Twee Pauwen Gallery in The Hage.

Complete collections of Niels Van Burgst’s work, including contact information, can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/nielsSvanB and https://www.instagram.com/niels_smits_van_burgst/

Middle Insert Image: Niels Smits van Burgst, “De Schilderkunst (The Art of Painting)”, 2003, Oil on Wood, 30 x 22 cm

Gustave Caillebotte

Paintings by Gustav Caillebotte

French painter and art collector Gustave Caillebotte was born in 1848 in Paris to Céleste Daufresne and Martial Caillebotte, a wealthy textile mill owner. He began drawing and painting at a young age on his family’s estate in Yernes, located south of Paris. Caillebotte studied law, completing  his law degree in 1868, and received his law license in 1870. Soon after his graduation, he was drafted to serve in the Franco-Prussian war as a member of the Garde Nationale de la Seine from July of 1870 to March of 1871.

Following the war, Caillebotte decided to pursue an artistic career. He visited the studio of Realist academic-painter Léon Bonnat, who reinforced his decision to take art as a serious career. In 1872, Caillebotte enrolled at the Êcole des Beaux-Arts and studied under Bonnat;  however, he spent most of the time painting in his own studio at the family home. Within a short period of time, Caillebotte suffered several losses in his family life: his father died in 1874, his brother Rene in 1876, and his mother died in 1878. The family fortune was divided between the remaining two brothers, Gustave and Martial, both of whom agreed to the sale of the Yerres estate and moved to an apartment in Paris. 

Beginning in 1874, Gustave Caillebotte met and befriended several artists who were working outside the influence of the Academie des Beaux-Arts; these artists included Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Pierre-Augustus Renoir, Camille Pissarro, and Giuseppe De Nittis. Caillebotte  made his artistic debut in 1876 at the Second Impressionist Exhibition in Paris, a show that would establish him as an indispensable figure in the group both artistically and financially. This loosely knit group of impressionist, avant-garde artists rejected the academic style of painting and the formality of the official Salon’s traditional exhibition protocols.  

Caillebotte’s style, which so outraged the contemporary critics and academics, conversely inspired later artists to use some of his more radical compositional techniques. His paintings often contained highly unusual perspectives, such as viewpoints looking up from below at a slanting floor, and viewpoints gazing down from an indistinctive perch or standing on the edge of an intimate scene. Caillebotte also cropped his protagonists and scenes in an unconventional manner, such as the foreground figures in his 1877 “Rue de Paris; Temps de Pluie” and 1878 “The Painter Under His Parasol” whose lower body portions are beyond the image plane. These innovative techniques became features of future avant-garde artists from Van Gogh to Pablo Picasso.

Caillebotte helped finance and organize the Third Impressionist exhibition, in which he exhibited eight paintings. Included in this show was his best known work, the 1875 “Floor Scrapers”, which had been rejected and deemed vulgar by the official Salon in 1875 for its depiction of common laborers. Caillebotte played a major role as a source of patronage and financial support for artists, such as Monet and Pissarro who were still endeavoring to achieve more widespread success. His family wealth enabled his to pursue his own artistic career and provide support for his artistic friends whose means were limited; it also enabled him to collect their work, often purchased at inflated prices. In 1876 Caillebotte purchased several works by Monet, and also paid the rent for some of his friends’ studios. He was also a major force in convincing the Louvre Museum to purchase Édouard Manet’s 1863 controversial painting “Olympia”, which had caused a scandal at the Salon’s 1865 exhibition for its cold and prosaic treatment of the female nude. 

In 1877, Caillebotte was the central organizer of the Third Impressionist Exhibition, which now had become an independent, unofficial and distinctly avant-garde salon. Although an important force in the avant-garde movement, his work did not explore the effects of light as did the other members’ work. Caillebotte was more a Realist in style, more aligned with the early works of Monet, Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet. He exhibited seventeen paintings at the seventh impressionist exhibition and, along with Monet, refused to participate in the final 1886 exhibition due to tensions between artists.

Gustave Caillebotte relocated to a property in Petit-Gennevilliers, a suburb on the Seine River, in 1881. A former yacht racer, he became active in constructing yachts and spent a majority of his time discussing philosophy, politics, literature and art with his brother Martial and good friend Augustus Renoir. By the early 1890s, Caillebotte was barely painting; he had stopped producing the large canvases for which he was known in the previous decades. In 1894, at the age of forty-five, while working in his home garden, Caillebotte collapsed and died suddenly of a stroke. He is buried at the famous Pere Lachaise Cemetery in southeastern Paris.

Following his death, Caillebotte’s estate, in keeping with his will, attempted to make a generous donation of his large collection of paintings, which contained both his and other artists’ works, to the French State. The 1894 donation spurred controversy, which emphasized the still prevalent French Academy’s resistance to avant-garde art and artists. Academy officials, with the artist Jean-Leon Gerome in the lead, attempted to prevent the transfer of the works by the Impressionists and the important Post-Impressionists, such as Paul Cézanne, to the French National Museum. 

These impressionist works had been consistently refused admission to the official Salons through the years; and the art establishment continued to oppose acceptance of what they referred to as unhealthy art. Only a portion of the works in the collection, of which only two were by Caillebotte, were ultimately accepted. In 1911, nearly thirty works from Caillebotte’s collection were purchased by Albert C. Barnes, an American physician, businessman, and art collector; these works form the core of the extensive collection of Modernist works at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Until the 1950s, when Caillebotte family members began selling works from their private collection, including paintings by Caillebotte as well as works by other artists he had acquired, Caillebotte’s work was for the most part forgotten. Most of these works from the private collections were eventually purchased by Albert Barnes in 1954 and added to the Barnes Foundation. With the purchase of Caillebotte’s 1877 “Paris Street, Rainy Day” by the Art Institute of Chicago in 1964, the work of Caillebotte was brought again to the attention of collectors and the public.

Tope Insert Image: Gustave Caillebotte, “Self Portrait”, 1892, Oil on Canvas, 40.5 x 32.5 cm, Musée d’Orsay, Paris

Second Insert Image: Gustave Caillebotte, “The Orange Trees”, 1878, Oil on Canvas, 154.9 x 116.8 cm, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Third Insert Image: Gustave Caillebotte, “Balcony, Boulevard Haussmann”, 1880, Oil on Canvas, 69 x 62 cm, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madird

Bottom Insert Image: gustave Caillebotte, “Self Portrait in the Park at Yerres”, 1875-1878, Oil on Canvas, 64 x 48 cm, Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Henry Taylor Lamb

Paintings by Henry Taylor Lamb

Harry Taylor Lamb was born in 1883 at Adelaide, Australia, one of seven children to Horace Lamb, a professor of mathematics at Manchester University, and his wife Elizabeth Foot, sister-in-law to Charles Hamilton, 5th Earl of Abercom. Lamb grew up in Manchester where he first studied medicine at the Manchester University Medical School, from which he obtained a graduate scholarship in 1904. Despite this, he  abandoned medicine and, with encouragement of his friend portrait artist Francis Dodd, changed his studies to art. 

In January of 1906 at the age of twenty-two, Lamb traveled to London to study under Welsh etcher and painter  Augustus John and Irish portrait painter William Orpen at their Chelsea Art School. In May of 1906, Lamb  married Nina Forrest, known as Euphemia, who was an artist’s model and a member of the Bloomsbury Group: however, the relationship was short-lived with the divorce finalized in 1927. Lamb was acquainted  with several members of the Group which included painter Vanessa Stephen and art critic Clive Bell, whom he knew from his earlier days in London, and critic and biographer Lytton Strachey, a friend for whom he later executed a small portrait in 1914 . Lamb painted a grand larger version of this portrait in 1914, which showed Strachey in his typical languid pose. 

In 1907, Henry Lamb attended the Académie de La Palette in Paris, which at that time was under the direction of portrait painter Jacques-Émile Blanche. Upon his return to London, he took a studio at Number 8 Fitzroy Street and became a member of the Fitzroy Street Group, a supportive organization for artists established in 1907. Lamb was a co-founder of the Camden Town Group, a collective of English Post-impressionist artists established in 1911. In 1913, both groups merged to form the London Group. Now one of the oldest artist-led organizations, it holds open submission exhibitions for members and guest artists.

Lamb spent several summers on the South coast of Brittany where he painted his 1911 “Death of a Peasant”, portraying the tragic death of cancer victim Madame Favennec. For this painting, he experimented with a fifteenth-century technique of painting oils over a layer of tempera. Inspired to seek out more traditional scenes for his work, Lamb traveled in 1912 to Gola, a small island off the coast of County Donegal, Ireland. There he made many paintings of the Irish fishermen and their wives, including the 1912 “Irish Girls”, a post-impressionist work now in the Tate collection. 

With the outbreak of the First World War, Lamb returned to his study of medicine, qualified as a doctor at Guy’s Hospital, and saw active service in the Royal Army Medical Corps as a battalion medical officer with the 5th Batalion.  For his service with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, he was awarded the Military Cross. Lamb also served in Palestine and on the Western Front. In February of 1918 before his end of service, he received a commission by the British War Memorials Commission to produce a large painting for a proposed Hall of Remembrance

Though he was not officially a military artist, Lamb produced many sketches of his time in the Palestine campaign and on the Macedonian Front, which would form the basis of future large-scale paintings. Two of his works from those sketches, the 1916 “Advanced Dressing Station on the Struma”, now in Manchester City Art Gallery, and the 1919 “Irish Troops in  the Judaean Hills”, now in the Imperial War Museum, are considered among his best work.

In 1928, Henry Lamb married novelist and biographer Lady Margaret Pansy Pakenham, a daughter of the 5th Earl of Longford, and settled in the village of Coombe Bissett, in Salisbury, United Kingdom. He was appointed an official full-time war artist by the War Artists Advisory Committee during World War II; at which time, he painted portraits of soldiers and studies of servicemen at work throughout southern England. In the winter of 1941, he was attached to the 12th Canadian Army Tank Battalion and painted a series of personnel portraits. 

Lamb was elected as an associate of the Royal Academy in 1940, became a Trustee for the National Portrait Gallery in 1942, and served as a Trustee from 1944 to 1951 at the Tate Gallery, He became a full member of the Royal Academy in 1949. Henry Taylor Lamb died, at the age of seventy-seven, on October 8th in 1969 at the Spire Nursing Home in Salisbury, Wiltshire, and is buried in the churchyard at Coombe Bissett. 

Retrospectives of Henry Lamb’s work have been held at the Salisbury Museum and the Poole Museum. His work can be found in collections across the country and aroundthe world, including the Tate Collection in London, the Imperial War Museum, the British Government Art Collection, and the National Gallery of Canada.

Note: Henry Lamb first met his friend Lytton Strachey at a party in London at the beginning of 1906. Strachey was gay and developed an enduring attraction to Lamb; however, his several attempts to seduce Lamb were unsuccessful. After Lamb returned to London in 1909 from his studies in Paris. Lytton introduced him to what would become known as the Bloomsbury Group. Among its members were Virginia and Leonard Woolf, E. M. Forster, Duncan Grant, and Bertram Russell.

Henry Lamb executed several paintings of his friend Strachey, which he included in his first solo exhibition at the Alpine Club Gallery in May and June of 1922. Among those works exhibited was his 1914 portrait “Lytton Strachey”, which showed Strachey seated against a large window at Lamb’s studio in Vale of Heath, Hampstead. Lamb emphasized Strachey’s gaunt, ungainly figure in his typical languid pose with a presented air of resigned intellectual superiority. The trees in the vista seen through the window are painted in a rhythmic, decorative manner consistent with Lamb’s essentially academic approach. Browns, violets, and greens predominate this palette which, woven into future compositions, would distinguish Lamb’s work from others in group exhibitions.

Insert Images from Top to Bottom::

Henry Lamb, “Self-Portrait, 1938, Oil on Canvas, 45.7 x 35.6 cm, Private Collection

Henry Lamb, “Phantasy”, 1912, Oil on Canvas, 86.4 x 61 cm, Tate Museum, London

Henry Lamb, “The Lady with Lizards”, 1900-1933, Oil on Canvas, 51.5 x 40.9 cm, Manchester Art Gallery

Henry Lamb, “Self_Portrait”, 1914, Oil on Panel, 36.8 x 31.8 cm, National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC

Jesse Hazel Arms

The Paintings of Jesse Arms

Born in Chicago, Illinois, on May 27, 1883, Jesse Hazel Arms was a painter, illustrator, printmaker, and muralist. She studied at the Art Institute of Chicago under Danish-American portraitist John Johanson and spent the summers studying with marine painter Charles Woodbury at his summer art colony school in Oguinquit, Maine. Following a short trip to Europe in 1909, Arms returned to her hometown of Chicago, where she worked as an artist and interior decorator.

Jesse Arms moved in 1911 to New York City where she became a student of painter and interior designer Albert Herter. She obtained employment with his company Herter Looms, a tapestry-textile design and manufacturing firm in New York City, where she specialized in tapestry cartoons until leaving the company in 1915. During her employment with Herter Looms, Arms assisted Albert Herter with his mural project for the Saint Francis Hotel in San Francisco and worked with Herter’s wife, still-life and portrait painter Adele Herter, as a private home decorator. 

Returning to her hometown of Chicago in 1915, Jesse Arms married Dutch-born painter and etcher Cornelius Botke. Together, they worked on murals in Chicago for the Kellogg Company and for the University of Chicago’s Noyes Hall, the social hub of the campus. In 1916, Jesse Arms gave birth to their only child, William. By 1917, after multiple exhibitions, she had gained recognition for her work and had won many awards both in Chicago and southern California. 

Following an initial visit in 1918 to California, Arms and her family relocated in 1919 to Carmel, California, where they became influential figures in the local art colony. The family eventually settled in 1927 on a ranch in Santa Paula, California, where Arms continued to paint and contributed to the managing of  the ranch. A prolific exhibitor of her work and member of both the California Art Club and the California Watercolor Society, Jesse Arms Botke died on October 2, 1971 in Santa Paula, California.

Jesse Arms was a prominent figure of the California School of Impressionism and became known for her exotic and richly decorated bird studies. Her highly detailed work depicted birds set in each species’ natural settings with an abundance of flora. Arms typically used oil paints, but also worked in watercolors and gouache; the backgrounds in her work were frequently embellished with gold and silver leaf. Arms also portrayed other subjects including genre and desert landscapes, and Native American figures.

Among the prizes award to Jesse Arms’s work are the 1918 Cahn Prize and the 1926 Shaffer Prize, both from the Art Institute of Chicago, and the 1938 Carpenter Prize from the Chicago Society for Sanity in Art. Her work can be seen in the collections of the San Diego Museum, Municipal Gallery of Chicago, Art Institute of Chicago, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Erin Hanson

Paintings by Erin Hanson

Beginning her study of oil painting as a child, Erin Hanson marked her appreciation for impressionism with her first viewing of Vincent van Gogh’s “Irises”. She began, at the age of twelve, her study of acrylic paint techniques  working at a mural studio. A high school scholarship enabled Hanson to study figure drawing at the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, California. After graduating, she attended UC Berkeley where she obtained a degree in Bioengineering. 

Erin Hanson’s treks through the lands and national parks of Nevada, Utah and Colorado inspired many of her landscape paintings. Immersing herself in her artwork, she has painted consistently since her graduation from college. Hanson uses a minimalist technique of impasto painting, layering wet paint strokes upon previous wet strokes, with color palettes of four to five colors for control. Her work focuses primarily on landscapes shown with a boldness of light and color. Hanson currently lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

Calendar

A Year: Day to Day Men: 23rd of November,  Solar Year 2018

Tiny Bears in a Row

November 23, 1862 was the birthdate of Belgian Neo-Impressionist painter Théo van Rysselberghe.

Born in Ghent, Théo van Rysselberghe studied at the Academy of Ghent under Theo Canneel and later at the Academie Royal des Beaux-Arts in Brussels under Jean-François Portaels. Van Rysselberghe was strongly influenced by North African paintings, which had become the fashion in Belgium. He made three trips to Morocco, staying there for a year and a half.

Van Rysselberghe painted his “Self Portrait with Pipe” in 1880, in the somber colors of the Belgium realistic tradition. His “Child in an Open Spot in the Forest”, also painted in that year, showed a move to impressionism. He started traveling extensively with his friends, impressionist Frantz Charlet and Asturian painter Dario de Regoyos, throughout Spain and Morocco, staying in Tanger for four months starting in October  of 1882. At this  time, Van Rysselberghe painted and drew many scenes form the streets and in the souk, including the 1882 “Arabian Street Cobbler”, the 1882 “Arabian Boy”, and “Resting Guard” in 1883.

Van Rysselberghe saw the works of the impressionists Monet and Auguste Renoir at the show of “Les XX” in 1886, becoming deeply impressed. He experimented with this technique in his 1886 “Woman with Japanese Album”. This impressionist influence became prominent in his later paintings. In 1886 he also discovered the pointillist techniques at that Eighth Impressionist Exhibition in Paris, abandoning realism and became an adept of pointillism,

Theo Van Rysselberghe’s “Gate of Mansour-El-Hay” and”Morocco-the Great Souk”, both done in 1887, are painted in the pointillist style, but still with short strokes of paint and not with points. These are among his rare pointillist paintings of Morocco. When he had finished these paintings, he stopped completely with this Moroccan period in his life. Van Rysselberghen then turned to portraiture, resulting in a series of neo- impressionist portraits. His famous portrait of Alice Sèthe, painted in 1888 in blue and gold, would become a turning point in his life. In this painting he used only points of paint on the canvas.

In 1898 Van Rysselberghe moved to Paris, although he maintained close links with the artistic milieu of Brussels, and executed in 1902, among other works, a series of decorative panels for the Hôtel Solvay, belonging to Victor Horta. Van Rysselberghe also played an important role in the introduction of the fauvist painters, whom he had met through his friend Paul Signac, to Belgium. From 1903 onward, his neo- Impressionism began to give way to more restrained forms, and during the last years of his life he also executed some sculptures. Van Rysselberghe died on the 13th of December of 1926 in Saint-Clair, France.